Tag Archives: Racial Equality

Who We Are as “The People”


We have seen the National Defense Authorization Act 2012 pass in the both houses of Congress and signed into law by the president of the United States that allows for indefinite detention of American citizens without habeas corpus.  We have seen basic human rights ignored and denied by our fellow Americans through bans on gay marriage.  We have seen basic health care and housing denied to our population because they haven’t the money to care for themselves.  We have seen corporations evolve into entities that are considered individuals deserving rights.  What this all means is that we have forgotten who we are.  Any society, Roman, Ottoman, Egyptian, or any other, that forgets what it is, is doomed to reduction into oblivion so that something more aware and healthier can take its place.

When we removed ourselves from under the rule of King George III of Great Britain, we codified several facets of the lives we wanted into two documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

United States of America Declaration of Independence

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Most people discuss the “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” part of this sentence.  A word at the beginning is much more intriguing – “self-evident.”   They could have used the word “clear,” or perhaps “obvious,”  but they chose “self-evident” in this beautifully-crafted statement.   The authors made it clear that we as individuals are supposed to assume that all members of our society are equal and deserve the same treatment and benefits as every other citizen in our country.  These rights are not issued with discretion by any other citizen; they are a natural part of being a citizen of this country.  Not only are they a natural part of being American, we cannot be alienated or separated from those rights in any way by anyone or any entity, including our own government.

This first section is the part we all know; however, there is another part of this paragraph that we tend to forget:

“— That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it,  and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Most people discuss the rights identified in this section as pertaining to themselves, missing the broader picture.  Individuals have the proclivity to protect their own land, property, families, and rights.  It may be an instinctual process; however, by focusing on one’s self alone, one misses a larger responsibility as a citizen of the United States – to protect our nation as a whole.  We rightly value those who serve in our military as protectors of our liberties, yet we forget that we, too, have a weight on our shoulders as well.  We must assume the rights of all citizens and fight to correct anything that disallows members of our society from their freedoms.

In the Preamble to the Constitution, the first words, “We the People of the United States in order to form a more perfect Union,”  reiterates what we found in the Declaration of Independence.  The authors said again that we as a whole must come together to work hand-in-hand to achieve the most unified citizenry and society we can.  It didn’t say, “We the governors…” or “We the few…”  or “We the wealthy and powerful…”   It says “We the People.”  All the people.  Everyone single one of us inclusively has a role to play to elevate ourselves toward the hopes of those who began our country.

Preamble to the United States of America’s Constitution

“We the People  of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

The question for us becomes this:  Which single individual in our country deserves less than everything promised in our Declaration of Independence and our Constitution of the United States?  Which person out of the millions born in our land or who have chosen our country as their homeland, requires or deserves fewer freedoms than any other?  Any thinking person will, of course, respond that there is not one person that deserves less.  Some might say non-Christians, gays, Muslims, the disabled, the mentally ill, or those born in other countries deserve fewer freedoms.  Certainly those who would say this are wrong according to our nation’s establishing documents.  They are acting contrary to our national intention.  And who is responsible for defending these individuals who have lost their voice and their first-class citizenship in our country?

In the same way as our founding fathers intended, each one of us is responsible, wholly and without abjuration, to ensure the full and irrevocable rights of all American citizens through word and deed.  Anything less is contrary to who we are as a people.  As we’ve learned in other fallen civilizations, we must remember who we are if we are to survive as a nation.