My Speech


NEMThe National Equality March in Washington, D.C., scheduled for October 10-11, 2009, presented Americans an opportunity to offer their three-minute speeches for selection for this event.  They called it “March Equality Idol Auditions.”  They asked that the theme reflect the reasons why it was important for the speaker to attend the March in Washington.   The voting between the top five speeches will be on Facebook and YouTube.  I only found out about the competition yesterday afternoon and I had to write the speech and get it filmed and sumbitted by today, Thursday September 17, 2009 at 5:00 PST.  My video turned out very nicely, I think.  Because of the lack of sufficient technology, I couldn’t find a way to download it onto my computer from the camera I have, and therefore, I didn’t submit it.   I must admit I am deeply disappointed right now.  I will always wonder if my speech would have been selected, even for the top five finalists. 

First, I am proud that my husband, David, figured out how to get the video onto our computer so that I can share it with you here.  Second, the text of the speech follows. 

Here is the text of my speech.  I hope you enjoy it. 

A Family Tradition of Hope

by James C. Glica-Hernandez

Written September 16, 2009

 

Three weeks before my tenth birthday in 1969, the Stonewall Riots erupted.  Being an avid reader of the newspaper even at that age, I knew what was happening in New York.  Men in dresses were fighting against the tyranny of bigotry and second-class citizenry in the greatest metropolis of the United States. The truth is, I didn’t know what to think about seeing gay people in the light of day because I had already been questioning my own sexuality in the haze of shame that every young, gay boy felt back then, and probably still does. 

A mere nine years later, then having a wife and child, and having come out to my family, I found myself marching under a drizzly Sacramento sky, in my first gay pride parade at the urging, and in the presence, of my beloved father, Floyd Glica.  When I protested about marching in the rain, Dad told me, “Jim, if we don’t stand up for who you are today, you will always be trampled upon by those who don’t like you just because you’re gay.  We have to march.” 

That day in 1978, I learned about gay pride from my fearless, remarkable Dad.  

I am now the patriarch of my family, including my husband, five children, and nine grandchildren.  I have seen someone in every generation of my family, as well as my students, wrestle with questions about their own sexuality.  Sadly, they’ve learned that they will have a lesser experience in the U.S. as a gay, lesbian, or bisexual person than a straight person would. 

My presence at the 2009 National Equality March is borne out of my love for my family, friends, and students.   Together, we demand the necessary leadership from President Obama and Congress that creates a voice, like my father’s, that mandates equality and freedom for all.    

The late Senator Edward Kennedy, arguably the most valiant warrior for equality ever to have graced the Senate floor, made a vital statement in 2007 regarding ENDA.  He said, “America stands for justice for all. Congress must make clear that when we say ‘all,’ we mean all. America will never be America until we do.”

The Chávez-Glica-Hernandez family thanks you for this opportunity to join with your families in a community of hope, power, and vibrant leadership to ensure that we all… Senator Kennedy’s all… my father’s all… are able to participate and contribute to our society as free men and women; free from the branding of sexuality, gender, color, religion, national origin, disability, or economic status, as it must be in these United States of America. 

Thank you.

###

Advertisements

2 responses

  1. raymond chavez-glica-hernandez/whitney | Reply

    hey,
    Great speach I believe you should be proud to have writen & published this masterpiece.

    I love you
    sincerly,

    RAYMOND CHAVEZ-GLICA-HERNANDEZ
    WHITNEY

    1. Thank you, Grandson! That means so much to me.

      Love, Dziadzia

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: